Bajiquan Wikia
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Name

The term Bashi 八式 means "eight styles" and refers to the 8 routines or "lines", while the word Jingang 金刚 refers to the "Invincible" Adamantine/Diamond Buddha Warrior Attendants, the supernatural protectors of Buddhist temples often featured in statues outside them.

The Ma Family, being Muslim, refer to their set as GanGong Bashi 刚功八式 instead.GangGong 刚功 translating to English as "hardness practice" and lacks the religious/philosophical connotation of Jingang 金刚, instead referring to the artistic expression during the practice.

History

Tracing back to Shaolin NeiYuan QuanFa 少林内院拳法 ("Shaolin inner-courtyard fist"), these movements are not exclusive to Bajiquan, as Jingang Bashi is actually from shaolin. The movements were adopted by several (but not all) schools of Bajiquan many years after its initial inception and are prevalent in most traditions, however, their execution does vary between different traditions as the movements have changed over time.

The Shaolin Ba Shi (8 postures) was trained alongside the Shaolin Dan Shi (single postures) as a foundational set in Qing dynasty era Shaolin Quan. During the 1800s, these routines reached Hebei and began to influence several styles including Ba Fan Men, Xing Yi Quan, Bagua Zhang, and Baji Quan enough to become a part of their curriculae.

Some styles teach that Shi Yushan 石玉山, future head of Tianjin's eleventh Guoshu Guan (national Martial Arts Association), was taught it by a Shaolin monk. Late, Tian Jinzhong 田金钟, a disciple of Shi's who had also studied with Wu Xiu-Feng (吴秀峰), implemented the movements into the Baji curriculum.

In the Ma Family, their GanGong Bashi originally stems from Li RuiDong's line.

Jingang Bashi can also be found in Yue Jia Duanda Chui (岳家短打捶,General Yue Fei's Close strike hammers), as it spread from Shaolin to the area in Shandong province from which Tanglang Quan was eventually developed.

Due to Dong Hai Chuan having learnt Ba Fan Shan and Jingang Bashi from his elder cousin, a famous Ba Fan Shan master in Hebei, it seems there is also a connection between the Jingang Bashi and Bagua Zhang.[1]

Training

The Jingang Bashi are generally trained linearly, consisting of repeating a single movement multiple times. They can be practiced using only one side of the body, or by alternating left/right.

The Form

Names are presented in their Chinese terms, followed by Pinyin, and finally an English Translation. If you are on the mobile page, please slide the table to the left to view the rest of it.

Style 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th
Shaolin 降龙

Xiáng Lóng

Subdue Dragon

伏虎

Fú Hǔ

Beat Tiger

分心掌

Fen Xin Zhang

Divide Heart Palm

穿捶

Chuan Chui

Piercing Hammer

盖捶

Gai Chui

Covering Hammer

野马掌

Ye Ma Zhang

Wild Horse Palm

捧肘推山

Peng Zhou Tui Shan

Hold Elbow Push Mountain

单凤掌

Dan Feng Zhang

Single Wind Palm

An 撑捶Chēng Chuí 穿掌

Chuan zhang

降龙

Xiáng Lóng

伏虎

Fú Hǔ

劈山掌

Pī Shān Zhǎng

探马掌

Tàn Mǎ Zhǎng

虎抱

Hǔ Bào

Baji Association 撑捶Chēng Chuí[2]

Punter's Fist

Lü Baochun

穿掌

Chuan zhang

Piercing Palm

Lü Baochun

劈山掌

Pī Shān Zhǎng

Mountain Splitting Palm

Lü Baochun

降龙Xiáng Lóng

Taming The Dragon

Lü Baochun

伏虎

Fú Hǔ

Take Down The Tiger

Lü Baochun

探马掌

Tàn Mǎ Zhǎng

Spying Palm

Lü Baochun

虎抱

Hǔ Bào

Tiger's Embrace

Lü Baochun

圈抱掌

Quān Bào Zhǎng

Three Circle Embrace

Lü Baochun

Huo 撑捶

Chēng Chuí

迎面掌

Yíng Miàn Zhǎng

降龙

Xiáng Lóng

伏虎

Fú Hǔ

劈山掌

Pī Shān Zhǎng

探马掌

Tàn Mǎ Zhǎng

圈抱掌

Quān Bào Zhǎng

虎抱

Hǔ Bào

Ma
TianJin 降龙

Xiáng Lóng

Zhou JingXuan

伏虎

Fú Hǔ

Zhou JingXuan

Cheng Zhang

Zhou JingXuan

撑捶

Chēng Chuí

Zhou JingXuan

Long Na

Zhou JingXuan

探马掌

Tàn Mǎ Zhǎng

Zhou JingXuan

劈山掌

Pī Shān Zhǎng

Zhou JingXuan

WuTan 馬步衝捶

Mabu Chong Chuei

Horse Step Punch

左右攬捶

Zuǒyòu lǎn chuí

Hammerfall Strike

崩捶靠

Bēng chuí kào

Collapsing Palm

連環捶

Liánhuán chuí

Chaining Fist

小纏衝二捶

Xiǎo chán chōng èr chuí

Coiling Double Strike

劈挑掌捎捶

Pī tiāo zhǎng shāo chuí

Split Palm Cleaving

左右橫打

Zuǒyòu héng dǎ

Horizontal Strike

磋步托天掌

Cuō bù tuō tiān zhǎng

Hold the palm of the sky

Wudang
Xu

Characteristics of each style

An

The An Family teaches Jingang Bashi as part of its initial Bajiquan training. The lines are practiced with opening and closing movements facing the side, and feature a distinctive turning movement at the start and finish of each line. They are used to teach practitioners fa li(发力, force generation) principles prior to learning Taolu. 降龙 Xiáng Lóng and 劈山掌 Pī Shān Zhǎng are generally taught together, out of sequence, as they use similar but opposing principles.

An JianQiu[3] translates the name into English as: "the eight hardest fighting movements", with "hardest" not referring to difficulty but to the feeling of indestructibility that is cultivated in Bajiquan. After stances, this is the first set of Bajiquan movements learned at the school.

Baji Association

Baji Association uses Jingang Bashi as a basic training method, alongside XiaoJia. Believing that it should be performed at a "moderate pace" with focus on structure and quality of movement, it is one of the most fundamental sets in the curriculum. Lü Baochun has been quoted to have advised training 200+ repetitions (100 for each side) of Cheng Chui, in particular, as a method of developing power.

Han

Huo Family

Huo Family Bajiquan teaches the Jingang Bashi at the third "stage" (out of a total seven) of their practice, following learning foundational movements, XiaoJia, DanDa and Pigua Zhang taolu.

Ma Family

The Ma Family takes a rather different approach to the set than other schools; current practice in Ma family is to break up Ganggong Bashi and spread them out into the Ma family’s basic curriculums, as opposed to learning it in the Bajiquan curriculum.

Wu Family

WuDang Pai

The WuDang Pai / Shizaam school, created by Ismet Himmet, appears to have a routine known as the "Nine Fists" which seems to be based on the JinGang BaShi and includes some of the same techniques including PiShan Zhang and the first two techniques bear heavy similarities to Cheng Chui and Chuang Zhang. This version is said to come from Long Jin-Ju.[4]

WuTan

Wu-Tan continues to follow the principle of "Basic Movements" before forms, in this case Xiao Baji. While Jingang Bashi is taught early on, especially to newly advanced Tanglangquan students, Following after 'Mabu Chong Chuei stage 1'. The layers are slowly revealed as the student progresses, gradually adding on and expanding after grinding repetitiously and meticulously. Thus, It is common for WuTang students to continually revisit the basics and the forms, even after many years; Again after Xiao Baji, Again after Da Baji and Again after Liu Da Kai and beyond.

Examples showing movements based on the body mechanics utilized in the one-punch are illustrated by the "Guardian Warrior's Eight Postures" (jin gang ba shi) (see links below). Technically, these eight sequences are not really thought of as a form, but are singularly executed and practiced in a linear fashion similar to xingyi's five elements. Each sequence is done for ten to fifteen movements before continuously moving onto the next sequence. These sequences can take anywhere from twenty to thirty minutes to perform, but close attention must be paid to the structural alignments. Too often beginning students race through these lines as quickly as possible and defeat the entire purpose of relaxed, focused training.

The essence of our Bajiquan moves is called [Eight Guardian Postures] which is the foundation of the skill moves. The eight major moves can be single-operated, combined, and disassembled. Dismantle eight hands in one move. Eight hands evolve into eight, eight and sixty-four hands, which is the essence of Bajiquan.

        The basic attack technique is based on eight major moves. These eight strokes are all centered on the "six big opening" top, hold, single, lift, carry and wrap six characters. Change into a move. One move and one hand can be dismantled. It can be divided into upper, middle, and lower by six-character decision, which can be used both inside and outside. One move can be combined with six characters. Sometimes one move includes three characters. Use two characters together, or use one character to make a move, combined and divided alternately. Its techniques emerge in endlessly, continuously, flexibly, and unpredictable, and its Yin Shou, Sanshou, and small techniques are extremely rich.

馬步衝捶

Mabu Chong Chuei

Horse Step Punch

左右攬捶

Zuǒyòu lǎn chuí

Hammerfall Strike

崩捶靠

Bēng chuí kào

Collapsing Palm

連環捶

Liánhuán chuí

Chaining Fist

小纏衝二捶

Xiǎo chán chōng èr chuí

Coiling Double Strike

劈挑掌捎捶

Pī tiāo zhǎng shāo chuí

Split Palm Cleaving

左右橫打

Zuǒyòu héng dǎ

Horizontal Strike

磋步托天掌

Cuō bù tuō tiān zhǎng

Hold the palm of the sky

The Eight Gaurdian Postures is the content of Shaolin Inner Gallery System. Tianjin Taiji Master Li Ruidong has passed on the complete content. This is why the answerer upstairs said that there is no Guardian Eight Form in the Tai Chi he has learned, because Guardian Eight Form is originally It is not in Tai Chi, but Li Ruidong joined in. The Baji boxer Li Shuwen and Li Ruidong changed their skills, and only then did the Bajimen's Guardian Eight Form. Moreover, Li Shuwen only learned the basics of the eight-style Vajrayana, and changed it in accordance with the style of the eight-pole. This is why the eight-style vajra style does not have much content, and it is not quite similar to the eight-style vajra style passed by Tianjin Li Ruidong The same reason.

The source of the Eight Forms of Guardian has been very clear, so I will talk about my own views on the subject of "Why treat things from other factions as basic skills" proposed in the answer. Although the Eight-Chip Guardian Style was learned from Li Ruidong’s predecessors, the eight-pole ancestors modified it in the form of eight-pole boxing. You can compare the Guardian Eight Styles passed by Li Shuwen and Li Ruidong. The difference is very obvious. . (Senior Li Ruidong’s main practice method is Taijiquan, but the eighth form of Guardian is something of Shaolin. It can be seen that exchanges between schools in the Republic of China are very normal.) The eighth form of Bajiquan, the move is learned from others, but issued It is the cross-top pull-strength of the Bajiquan. The movement specifications are the shoulders and elbows of the Bajiquan. It’s just that these eight movements of the eight forms of Guardian are particularly suitable for making cross-top pull-strength training templates; the use of Bajiquan can give full play to the power of these eight moves, and they are very useful; it can be said that eight The force of Jiquan and the eight-style moves of Guardian have a natural consistency. In addition, the most commonly practiced in the eight forms of Guardian are the upper step punch and the upper step palm, which are very basic movements. These two movements are originally in the Bajiquan routine. On the other hand, I think the main body of martial arts inheritance is people, not the type of boxing. What a boxer passes down depends on what he has learned, to what extent he has learned each content, and what he thinks is important, not on what is inherent in the type of boxing. Therefore, it is normal that there will be obvious differentiation after three or four generations. Wu Zhong, the ancestor of Bajiquan, is famous for Liuhe Daqiang. According to legend, Bajiquan and Liuhe Daqiang are not learned from the same teacher. To some extent, Bajiquan can be considered in Wu Zhongye’s inheritance. The work comes from another school, but Bajiquan has become the most basic training content in the inheritance of later generations. PS: Huo's Bajiquan's most distinctive technique-Diaoqiu Gong, was learned by Huo Diange's ancestors from his friend Gao Dao. (One is that the high Daoist sees the Bajimen practicing grasping the jar, and the idea given to them is replaced by a mud ball. The high Daoist does not necessarily practice it by himself. This is considered to be the method invented by the high Daoist. The core swordsmanship of Jiquan-Pure Yang Sword and advanced exercises-Yi Jin Jing, were all added by the sage Li Shuwen (who does not know who learned it). Although splitting the palm as a separate routine for selective practice is not very important in the Huo's Bajiquan system, the most basic warm-up activity-walking the acupoint, is the thing for splitting the palm.

Xu


References

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